10 Great Quotations from Women Writers


Originally posted on Interesting Literature:

As tomorrow (8th March) is International Women’s Day, we’ve gathered together ten of our favourite quotations from women writers. Some are wise, some are witty, some weird; all are wonderful, in our opinion. And what unites them all is that they were uttered (or written) by some of the major female figures in literature. We’d be interested to hear your favourite quotations from women writers, in the comments below – which names/quotations have we missed off?

Austen

‘Going to the opera, like getting drunk, is a sin that carries its own punishment with it.’ – Hannah More

‘If only we’d stop trying to be happy we’d have a pretty good time.’ – Edith Wharton

‘There must be quite a few things a hot bath won’t cure, but I don’t know many of them.’ – Sylvia Plath

‘One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.’ – Jane…

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Bookslinger Update: “Tickets on Time”


Originally posted on The Bookslinger:

The Bookslinger app has been updated with a new story!

This week’s story is from The Man Who Walked Through Walls by Marcel Aymé, published by Pushkin Press. Marcel Aymé’s most celebrated tale provides the title of this collection of ten short stories. The excellent Monsieur Dutilleul is able to penetrate walls, but never exploits his gift until his tyrannical boss drives him to desperate measures. How will the unassuming clerk adjust to a glamorous life of crime?

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AWP 2014: Writing Feminism in Creative Nonfiction


Originally posted on BREVITY's Nonfiction Blog:

awp-reading

A lot of folks are talking about feminism right now, especially in writing and publishing. And a lot of folks are talking about creative nonfiction, the wayward fourth genre that’s finally asserting itself in classrooms and literary journals. But we aren’t talking much about the intersection of feminism and creative nonfiction. And we ought to be.

Sarah Lenz’s AWP panel on ‘Writing Feminism in Creative Nonfiction’ featured five women who have spent a lot of time thinking about the feminist issues unique to nonfiction writing: Lenz, Marcia Aldrich, Kristen Iversen, Sonja Livingston, and Mary Kay McBrayer. Rather than report on each panelists’ talk, let’s just dive in to the most urgent and interesting ideas.

Creative nonfiction is a genre of de facto feminism:

“I’m a de facto feminist,” Lenz said, opening the panel. “I write from a woman’s perspective because I can’t escape my own identity.” Regardless of their initial motivation or agenda, all…

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Book of the Week: Jacinda Townsend’s ‘Saint Monkey’


Originally posted on Flavorwire:

Two things tend to worry me in novels by authors I’ve never read before. One is a setting in a period of American history that’s more than 50 years in the past; the other is a story told from the point of view of two or more narrators. For her debut novel, Saint Monkey, Jacinda Townsend has done both of them. She writes from both Audrey’s and Caroline’s point of view, and the book is set in the late 1950s. What’s more, she shifts the story’s setting back and forth between the Jim Crow-era South and Harlem. These are all difficult tricks to pull off, but Townsend executes them effortlessly.

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International Prize for Arabic Fiction Judge Mehmet Hakkı Suçin: Advice to Young Novelists


Originally posted on Arabic Literature (in English):

At the time of the International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) shortlist announcement, ArabLit and 7iber had interviews with four of the five judges. One judge was missing, Mehmet Hakkı Suçin; he was unable to make the events in Amman because of health troubles. He graciously followed up with an email interview. 

mehmetArabLit: Did you have particular criteria as you went through and looked at the books? When wading through the initial 156 (!), what told you if the book might make the first cut?

Mehmet Hakkı Suçin:  At the beginning of the process, we discussed as a committee the criteria on which we would rely in the process of reviewing the books. I said to myself: Is it possible for us to define criteria with which to choose one book over another? And indeed, I had set definitions to use during the evaluation process.

But after conversations with…

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A Bird Is Not a Stone: The Palestinian Poets ‘Rarely Translated into English’


Originally posted on Arabic Literature (in English):

A Bird is not a Stone , ed. Henry Bell and Sarah Irving, is a collection of poems by contemporary Palestinian writers forthcoming from Glasgow’s Freight Books. The translations are done — through the bridge method — by 25 of Scotland’s top poets. Irving talks about the collection, which she suggests is perhaps “freer” for being a bridge translation:

A_bird_is_not_a_stone_270.270ArabLit: Can you say a little more about what the George Wyllie sculpture “A Bird Is Not a Stone” has to do with the ethos of the project?

Sarah Irving: There were several reasons this ended up as the title. Partly it was to do with the history of the sculpture itself, which was built by the Berlin Wall and which ‘keeked’ over, and there are obvious parallels with the situation of Palestinian poets having to ‘keek’ over real and metaphorical walls which have been constructed around them. And then in…

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Hope and Joy Amid Difficulty: The Lowland


Originally posted on The Bookshelf of Emily J.:

I’ve been a fan of Jhumpa Lahiri’s since reading her first novel The Namesake (2003), and I moved from there to her short stories, including the Pulitzer Prize–winning collection Interpreter of Maladies (1999).  I will read anything she writes.  So when her second novel The Lowland (2013) came out last year, I jumped at the chance to read it.  I quickly put my name on the library list, and then I had to wait many months to actually get my hands on it.  It was worth the wait.

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The novel is about two brothers, born around World War II.  Udayan becomes a Naxalite Communist in India in the 1960s, while the Subhash goes to Rhode Island for school.  He stays in the United States and earns a Ph.D., eventually marrying his brother’s wife!  It is an interesting and tragic twist of fate.  His brother is arrested and executed for being…

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